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About the Author
Sherrie Carris received her B.F.A. from the University of Texas, and her M.A. and M.F.A. from the University of Iowa 1n 1972. Along with her husband Tom they have owned and operated Carris Pottery for over 30 years.Sherrie's floral pottery has been widely collected including a large carved porcelain planter in the TN governor's mansion. The State of TN bought one of her pieces to give to Patricia Neal. Artist in Residence Children's Museum of Oak Ridge

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4-24-10

Japanese Rice Field Art


Every once and a while I get an email from someone that reminds me that the human race and even animails are "hard wired" for art. Neanderthals made jewelry, art objects that along with flowers were found in graves of family members.

I was sent this email a couple of times. You may have seen these pictures; but, I couldn't resist passing it along. Wish I could properly credit the original author and photographer for these pictures. No credits accompanied the email.

I'll bet rice field art generates a lot art tourism!

- Sherrie

"This is absolutely amazing and so beautiful ? we need to look at things like this some to keep us sane ? There is good talent in the world!

RICE FIELDS OF JAPAN ? Astounding.

Stunning crop art has sprung up across rice fields in Japan, but this is no alien creation. The designs have been cleverly planted.

Farmers creating the huge displays use no ink or dye. Instead, different color rice plants have been precisely and strategically arranged and grown in the paddy fields.

As summer progresses and the plants shoot up, the detailed artwork begins to emerge. The colors are created by using different varieties. This photo was taken in Inakadate, Japan. Napoleon on horseback can be seen from the skies. This was created by precision planting and months of planning by villagers and farmers located inInakadate.

Japanese Rice Field Art Japanese Rice Field Art
Japanese Rice Field Art

Farmers create the murals by planting little purple and yellow-leafed Kodaimai rice along with their local green-leafed Tsugaru, a Roman variety, to create the colored patterns. This is done between planting and harvesting in September.

Japanese Rice Field Art

The murals in Inakadate cover 15,000 square meters of paddy fields.

From ground level the designs are invisible, and viewers have to climb the mock castle tower of the village office to get a glimpse of the work. Closer to the image, the careful placement of thousands of rice plants in the paddy fields can be seen.

Rice-paddy art was started there in 1993 as a local revitalization project, an idea that grew from meetings of village committees. The different varieties of rice plants grow alongside each other to create the masterpieces.

In the first nine years, the village office workers and local farmers grew a simple design of Mount Iwaki every year. But their ideas grew more complicated and attracted more attention. In 2005 agreements between landowners allowed the creation of enormous rice paddy art plantings.

Japanese Rice Field Art

A year later organizers used computers for precise plot planting of the four differently colored rice varieties that bring the images to life." - Unknown


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