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About the Author
Sherrie Carris received her B.F.A. from the University of Texas, and her M.A. and M.F.A. from the University of Iowa 1n 1972. Along with her husband Tom they have owned and operated Carris Pottery for over 30 years.Sherrie's floral pottery has been widely collected including a large carved porcelain planter in the TN governor's mansion. The State of TN bought one of her pieces to give to Patricia Neal. Artist in Residence Children's Museum of Oak Ridge

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MEDIA PREVIEW AT THE FRIST AND
VISIT TO VANDERBILT FINE ARTS GALLERY

When Tom and I went to Nashville for the media preview of the exhibitions “Societe Anonyme: Modernism in America” from the Yale collection and “Rosemary Laing: Flight” at the Frist Center for the Visual Arts, I knew I was going to see something special. Jennifer R. Gross, the Seymour H. Knox, Jr. curator of modern and contemporary art at Yale University Art Gallery conducted a guided walk through the “Societe Anonyme” exhibit.  She gave information and insight about the artwork and the artists in the exhibition.   http://artmuseumtouring.com/Frist.html

Walking in to the exhibition was like being back in my art history classes in college while studying for my MFA.  There were paintings and artists I had studied, but never seen in person; Josef Albers, Alexander Archipenko, Arthur Dove, Max Ernst, Arshile Gorky, Wassily, Kandinsky, Man Ray, Kurt Schwitters, Joseph Stella, Constatin Brancusi, Francis Picabia, Marcel Duchamp, Piet Mondrian.  I had heard about the suitcases of  Duchamp with miniature copies of his sculpture (the Urinal - the 1913 Armory Show) and paintings, etc., but, I had never seen one, nor a photograph of one.  Well, there is one in this exhibition.  Societe Anonyme fills in not only the information that I had forgotten as a student, but the modern art artists and the role of the avant-garde from 1920 - 1940.  

 One of my fond memories of doing the Philadelphia Craft Show years ago with our pottery (other than having work commissioned by Henry McIlhenny then Chairman of the Board of the Philadelphia Art Museum) was going to the Philadelphia Art Museum and walking into an area that was full of late 19TH century and 20TH century art.  I have not had the experience of seeing so many of the artists and their work that I had studied in one place again until the “Societe Anonyme”.  This exhibition is terrific.

The Frist Center Curator, Katie Delmez, gave a walk-through for the media preview of the “Rosemary Laing: Flight” exhibition.  She gave a lot of insight about Laing’s series of large- scale color photographs created from 1998-2006. 
Using the same single figure against the background of the sky seemingly defying gravity, we see the photographs over the years transition from optimistic to chaotic.   The images are strong, evocative, and disturbing.  They made me wonder: Why is the woman there?  How did she get there? What is she trying to tell us?  Laing leaves it to the viewers to draw their own conclusions. 

While it was a privilege to be part of the media and get the guided tour (and great coffee), the downside was that the museum closed at noon (We later discovered the upstairs of the Frist was open).  I could have spent hours there and am planning on going back as soon as I can.  However, that gave us time for us to go see the “More Than One” print show at the Vanderbilt Fine Arts Gallery, a small but very nice gallery in the Old Gym.

Two small prints were the first pieces of art that I purchased for myself.  I have since purchased and traded for many more.  I even took a printmaking class at the UT Knoxville while getting my teaching certificate for Art and History. 

Vanderbilt had an interesting variety of prints including a large multi-media print.  There were some really interesting prints with political statements. I especially enjoyed seeing in person the Ron Adams’ “Blackburn - 2002” which has a printmaker making a litho on an old press with a Magritte type figure behind the press.  It is a neat print.
The pieces really come to life when you see them in person. I would never have
realized that the Duchamp’s “Tu’m” painting has a bottlebrush sticking straight out from it to create an extra shadow. 
I hope you enjoy my newsletter.  I will be sending one out again from time to time as I have more to tell you about the my trips to see the exhibitions at the various museums you can see on Art Museum Touring.com. www.artmuseumtouring.com

Sherrie Carris
Art Museum Touring.com

 P.S.  To see the pottery we are primarily known for visit:
www:carris-studio.com.


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