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Ohr-O’Keefe Museum of Art
Biloxi, MS
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images Ohr-Okeefe Museum of Art copyright 2008

Ohr-O’Keefe Museum of Art
386 Beach Boulevard
Biloxi, MS 39530
228-374-5547

Mailing Address:
Post Office Box 248
Biloxi, MS 39533-0248

Administrative Offices
Ohr-O’Keefe Museum of Art
City of Biloxi Center for Ceramics, 3rd floor
386 Beach Boulevard
Biloxi, MS 39530

Map

e-mail: info@georgeohr.org


www.georgeohr.org

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Exhibitions:

James Michalopoulos: Southern Spirits, Texture & Tumult

Rhythm & Movement: Sculpture by Martin Payton

George E. Ohr: Prized, Honored & Cherished

George Edgar Ohr: Selections from Gulf Coast Collections

My House: The Pleasant Reed Story

The Native Guard: A Photographic History of Ship Island’s African American Regiment


Events

James Michalopoulos: Southern Spirits, Texture & Tumult
December 12, 2015 – March 6, 2016

Michalopoulos captures the unique essence of the “Big Easy,” where he is best known for his vibrant, swirling, textural oil paintings that have become iconic symbols of the city. He studied art at the University of New Orleans and New Orleans Academy of Fine Arts, although he claims to be primarily self-taught. He began his artistic career as a street artist, but his visual representations of “soaring” New Orleans architecture with complex colors and texture became more and more popular. The subjects of his artwork have extended to include thought-provoking portraits, paintings of vintage cars and lush landscapes, and colorful abstract sculpture, all of which exude rich color and texture and depict his use of unlimited freedom of artistic expression and love of the New Orleans culture, music and architecture. As one of the favorite artists of the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Foundation, Michalopoulos has received a commission for the annual Jazz Fest poster six times. His talents extend to entrepreneur as founder of Celebration Distillation, the 20-year-old distillery that makes Old New Orleans Rum. Michalopoulos maintains studios and galleries in New Orleans and Burgundy, France.


Rhythm & Movement: Sculpture by Martin Payton
December 5, 2015 – March 13, 2016
Beau Rivage Resort & Casino Gallery / Gallery of African American Art

Martin Payton’s work aims to maintain the legacy of African American culture in historical figures and jazz legends, such as McCoy Tyner and Keith Jarrett, by conveying a sense of celebration of African American achievement. Music is an important element in Payton’s creative process, as West African polyrhythms and chants that characterize jazz, blues and gospel are reflected in his vibrant forms. His sculptures display a human charisma because of their gracefulness and verticality. Whether kinetic or static, Payton’s sculptures are fluid and convey a sense of rhythm and movement.
Toshiko Takaezu (1911-2011) was a Japanese-American ceramist, born in Hawaii to Japanese immigrants. Her legendary tall, narrow cylinders and “closed forms” helped elevate ceramics from functional vessels to a fine art form. The unveiling of the 27 works in the OOMA collection feature sculptural pieces that range from monolithic closed vessel forms to small pieces that fit in one’s hand, and vary not only by size, but choice .


George E. Ohr: Prized, Honored & Cherished
Ongoing

Prized, Honored & Cherished is the inaugural exhibition in the first of the Frank Gehry-designed “Pods” to open to the public. The exhibition features many pieces of George Ohr pottery that have never been on display, including spectacular vases and pitchers, as well as a case full of recently-donated studio items. Most of the objects are from the Permanent Collection of the Ohr-O’Keefe Museum of Art with nine pieces on loan from private collectors. The pieces in the exhibition date from before October 1894 through the early 1900s, with one piece created before the fire that destroyed downtown Biloxi and Ohr’s studio. George Ohr (1857-1918) was an active potter from 1879-1910, creating distinctive ceramic forms adorned with vibrant glazes that exaggerated the traditional styles of his day. The exhibition explores a range of Ohr’s artistic styles in intimate artistic setting.


George Edgar Ohr: Selections from Gulf Coast Collections
Ongoing

George Edgar Ohr: Selections from Gulf Coast Collections highlights work from the collection of the Ohr-O’Keefe Museum of Art and private collections across the Gulf Coast region. George Edgar Ohr, “The Mad Potter of Biloxi”, was active from 1883 to 1910, creating innovative ceramics that are a central part of the artistic heritage of the Gulf South, and the broader canon of American Art. Today, 100 years after he ended his pottery-making career, George Edgar Ohr is considered an early leader in the American modernist movement.

Exhibition made possible by the Ford Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts


My House: The Pleasant Reed Story
Pleasant Reed Interpretive Center
Ongoing

The Pleasant Reed Interpretive Center is a reconstruction of the original house built by Pleasant Reed in the late 19th century that was destroyed by Hurricane Katrina in 2005. A visit to the Pleasant Reed Interpretive Center provides a rare opportunity to see how an African American born into slavery persevered in spite of daunting circumstances. Pleasant Reed was not the only individual born a slave who later built his family a house with funds earned in the post-Civil War economy; but his home is one of the few that that can be identified with a particular African American builder and homeowner. Authentic items that were used by the Reed family in the late 19th and early 20th century are also on display.


The Native Guard: A Photographic History of Ship Island’s African American Regiment
Pleasant Reed Interpretive Center Gallery
Ongoing

Photographs from the collection of C. P. (“Kitty”) Weaver of Massachusetts from the diary of Colonel Nathan W. Daniels, supplemented by photographs provided by Isiah Edwards of Long Beach, Mississippi, record the history of the 2nd Regiment of Louisiana Native Guards that served for the Union at Ship Island in the Mississippi Sound. Passages from the poetry of Pulitzer Prize winner Natasha Trethewey were inspired by the history of the Native Guards.

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