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Ohr-O’Keefe

Museum of Art

Biloxi, MS
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images Ohr-Okeefe Museum of Art copyright 2008

Ohr-O’Keefe Museum of Art
386 Beach Boulevard
Biloxi, MS 39530
228-374-5547

Mailing Address:
Post Office Box 248
Biloxi, MS 39533-0248

Administrative Offices
Ohr-O’Keefe Museum of Art
City of Biloxi Center for Ceramics, 3rd floor
386 Beach Boulevard
Biloxi, MS 39530

Map

e-mail: info@georgeohr.org


www.georgeohr.org

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Exhibitions:

Rod Moorhead: Entropy

Carl Joe Williams: Shades of Perception

Joseph Fortune Meyer: Master Potter ∙ Mentor

George Edgar Ohr: Selections from Gulf Coast Collections

My House: The Pleasant Reed Story

Events

Rod Moorhead: Entropy
December 17, 2013 – June 7, 2014

Rod Moorhead’s work ranges from small clay figures to large bronzes. He began his career as a potter, and still loves clay, although his public commissions include large-scale works, such as Concerto and James Meredith at the University of Mississippi and Storytellers — ten foot high limestone figures of the Mississippi writers William Faulkner, Eudora Welty and Richard Wright. His work is included in the Roger Ogden Collection in New Orleans and the collection of Morgan Freeman. He was honored with the Mississippi Institute of Arts and Letters Visual Arts Award for 2012. The exhibition will focus on Moorhead’s clay sculptures which are formed on an armature and are completed by firing in pits filled with straw.

This exhibition is funded by R&B Feder Charitable Foundation for the Beaux-Arts, the Mississippi Arts Commission, a state agency,
and the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency


Carl Joe Williams: Shades of Perception
December 10, 2013 – May 31, 2014

New Orleans artist Carl Joe Williams is driven by the search for universality. The rhythmic patterns in his paintings are inspired by the geometric forms found in nature. Williams describes his works as “symphonies of colors” that present a powerful visual experience. His interpretations are enhanced by his vision of art and music as extensions of one another. An accomplished musician as well as a visual artist, Williams incorporates his musical compositions into videos and installations. Found objects play an important role in Williams’s works by becoming elements a narrative continuum that addresses societal and historical concerns.

Funded in part by the Mississippi Arts Commission, a state agency, and the
National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency


George Edgar Ohr: Selections from Gulf Coast Collections
Ongoing

George Edgar Ohr: Selections from Gulf Coast Collections highlights work from the collection of the Ohr-O’Keefe Museum of Art and private collections across the Gulf Coast region. George Edgar Ohr, “The Mad Potter of Biloxi”, was active from 1883 to 1910, creating innovative ceramics that are a central part of the artistic heritage of the Gulf South, and the broader canon of American Art. Today, 100 years after he ended his pottery-making career, George Edgar Ohr is considered an early leader in the American modernist movement.

Exhibition made possible by the Ford Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts


My House: The Pleasant Reed Story
Pleasant Reed Interpretive Center
Ongoing

The Pleasant Reed Interpretive Center is a reconstruction of the original house built by Pleasant Reed in the late 19th century that was destroyed by Hurricane Katrina in 2005. A visit to the Pleasant Reed Interpretive Center provides a rare opportunity to see how an African American born into slavery persevered in spite of daunting circumstances. Pleasant Reed was not the only individual born a slave who later built his family a house with funds earned in the post-Civil War economy; but his home is one of the few that that can be identified with a particular African American builder and homeowner. Authentic items that were used by the Reed family in the late 19th and early 20th century are also on display.


The Native Guard: A Photographic History of Ship Island’s African American Regiment
Pleasant Reed Interpretive Center Gallery
Ongoing

Photographs from the collection of C. P. (“Kitty”) Weaver of Massachusetts from the diary of Colonel Nathan W. Daniels, supplemented by photographs provided by Isiah Edwards of Long Beach, Mississippi, record the history of the 2nd Regiment of Louisiana Native Guards that served for the Union at Ship Island in the Mississippi Sound. Passages from the poetry of Pulitzer Prize winner Natasha Trethewey were inspired by the history of the Native Guards.

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