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Ohr-O’Keefe Museum of Art
Biloxi, MS
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images Ohr-Okeefe Museum of Art copyright 2008

Ohr-O’Keefe Museum of Art
386 Beach Boulevard
Biloxi, MS 39530
228-374-5547

Mailing Address:
Post Office Box 248
Biloxi, MS 39533-0248

Administrative Offices
Ohr-O’Keefe Museum of Art
City of Biloxi Center for Ceramics, 3rd floor
386 Beach Boulevard
Biloxi, MS 39530

Map

e-mail: info@georgeohr.org


www.georgeohr.org

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Exhibitions:

June Ward: Passages and Possibilities

Bruce Davenport, Jr: I See You Looking

Cars In Art

George Edgar Ohr: Selections from Gulf Coast Collections

My House: The Pleasant Reed Story

The Native Guard: A Photographic History of Ship Island’s African American Regiment


Events

June Ward: Passages and Possibilities
June 17 - December 6, 2014

Passages and Possibilities follows the Gulfport, MS artist's passages through life as she searched for her artistic voice, open to all possibilities. Her art follows the cycle of the seasons in still life, landscape and figurative works. Flowers in her still life paintings show the natural progression of time with blooms at their peak, fading flowers and seeds signifying the repeating cycle. Her landscapes, which often include figurative elements, speak of the passage of time in different geographical locations. The overriding theme throughout all these categories is the emphasis of light, in an intimate setting accented with Ward's hand painted furniture.


Bruce Davenport, Jr: I See You Looking
Through November 29, 2014
Beau Rivage Resort & Casino Gallery / Gallery of African American Art

Bruce Davenport, Jr. (1972) is a self-taught artist who strives to preserve New Orleans culture. He was born in New Orleans and grew up in the Lafitte Housing Projects in the 6th Ward Treme neighborhood. Davenport’s hand-colored drawings of the Mardi Gras parade bands include fine points, such as the exact number of marchers, detailed uniforms and the instruments played by each band member. The artist’s use of ink and colored markers to create neat rows of colorful figures captures the rhythm and dynamics of the bands. His themes also include scenes of his experiences in the Lafitte Projects and penitentiary life, where he visited as a child. Davenport’s work has been exhibited in New York, Tokyo and New Orleans and is in public and private collections, including the New Orleans Museum of Art and the Benetton Group.

This exhibition is funded by the Mississippi Arts Commission, a state agency and the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency


Cars In Art
Through November 22, 2014
Mississippi Sound Welcome Center

Did you know that when a car is being built it is literally sculpted from clay? And that car designers are truly passionate artists – generally a team – who work on their creation until it is finally ready to be revealed to the world. The museum presents an exhibition of car drawings, paintings, sculptures and models in celebration of the 2014 Cruisin’ the Coast. The exhibition will include ten original drawings from the Collection of GM Design Archive & Special Collections.

George Edgar Ohr: Selections from Gulf Coast Collections
Ongoing

George Edgar Ohr: Selections from Gulf Coast Collections highlights work from the collection of the Ohr-O’Keefe Museum of Art and private collections across the Gulf Coast region. George Edgar Ohr, “The Mad Potter of Biloxi”, was active from 1883 to 1910, creating innovative ceramics that are a central part of the artistic heritage of the Gulf South, and the broader canon of American Art. Today, 100 years after he ended his pottery-making career, George Edgar Ohr is considered an early leader in the American modernist movement.

Exhibition made possible by the Ford Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts


My House: The Pleasant Reed Story
Pleasant Reed Interpretive Center
Ongoing

The Pleasant Reed Interpretive Center is a reconstruction of the original house built by Pleasant Reed in the late 19th century that was destroyed by Hurricane Katrina in 2005. A visit to the Pleasant Reed Interpretive Center provides a rare opportunity to see how an African American born into slavery persevered in spite of daunting circumstances. Pleasant Reed was not the only individual born a slave who later built his family a house with funds earned in the post-Civil War economy; but his home is one of the few that that can be identified with a particular African American builder and homeowner. Authentic items that were used by the Reed family in the late 19th and early 20th century are also on display.


The Native Guard: A Photographic History of Ship Island’s African American Regiment
Pleasant Reed Interpretive Center Gallery
Ongoing

Photographs from the collection of C. P. (“Kitty”) Weaver of Massachusetts from the diary of Colonel Nathan W. Daniels, supplemented by photographs provided by Isiah Edwards of Long Beach, Mississippi, record the history of the 2nd Regiment of Louisiana Native Guards that served for the Union at Ship Island in the Mississippi Sound. Passages from the poetry of Pulitzer Prize winner Natasha Trethewey were inspired by the history of the Native Guards.

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